In this Seoul Travel Guide for Food Lovers I’m going to share with you practical information about where to stay, how to get around, and most importantly, what to eat when you’re in Seoul.

There are a lot of amazing things about Seoul, but for you and I as food lovers, it’s the never ending amount of delicious food that makes Seoul such an exciting city.

Seoul Travel Guide for Food Lovers!

Incheon International Airport
Incheon International Airport near Seoul

Arriving and Leaving Seoul

There are a number of ways you could enter Seoul, but likely, if you take an international flight from a different country, you’ll land at Incheon International Airport.

Incheon International Airport

Incheon International Airport is a giant airport that caters to basically the entire northern part of South Korea, and is located approximately 1 hour by train from the center of Seoul. The airport is very nice and modern with easy transportation facilities (and there’s free wifi as well). I’ve even spent the night at Seoul Incheon Airport before, and it’s a pretty decent place to spend the night if you need to.

Getting from the airport to Seoul: The easiest way to get from the airport to the center of Seoul is by train. Once you get out of customs, follow the signs for the Airport Railroad, and you’ll have to cross over the road (either over or on ground) and get to the adjacent building which is the train station. There are a couple different options:

  • Express Train – This is the faster high speed train that goes directly from Incheon Airport to Seoul Station, and if you want to make sure you have a seat or if you have a lot of baggage this might be the best option. It takes about 43 minutes and the price is 14,800 Won ($12.62) per person.
  • Seoul Metro – I’ve never taken the express train, because the metro goes the same route, only take a few minutes longer and costs much less. But it does stop at 11 different stations along the way, and it can be busy, so you may need to stand. It takes about 56 minutes and costs 3,250 Won ($2.77).

You can read more information here, also scroll below to the Transportation section of this guide for more information about buying subway tickets and getting around Seoul.

Visa – No Visa Required

Another wonderful thing about visiting South Korea is that for many nationalities, getting a 90 day or 30 day stamp on arrival is a breeze. However, make sure you do your own research for your own nationality. If you qualify, all you have to do is fill out the small entry card (which you’ll be given on your flight), fly into Incheon International Airport, go through immigration, and they’ll stamp you into South Korea.

Alright, now you’re in Seoul!

Taking the Train Around South Korea

If you’re traveling onwards from Seoul to other parts of South Korea, taking the train is one of the most convenient ways to get around. Many trains to other parts of South Korea leave from either Seoul Station, Yongsan Station, or Cheongnyangni Station.

It’s recommended to book your train tickets a few days ahead of time so you can confirm that you’ll have a seat.

From Seoul my wife and I traveled to the food paradise of Jeonju, and we pre-booked out ticket the day before we left.

where to stay in Seoul
Here’s some information to help you choose where you stay.

Where To Stay In Seoul?

Seoul is a huge city and there are many different areas to stay in depending on your interests.

However, what I noticed about places to stay in Seoul, is because the public transportation system is so efficient and convenient to use, it’s not hugely important which area you stay in (as long as you’re somewhat central), because you can always get to where you need to go.

Seoul has nearly every form of accommodation available from modern hostels to major 5 star hotel brands. Prices for accommodation are overall quite high, but you do have plenty of options.

In this Seoul travel blog guide, I’m going to share a few of the main areas that you should consider and why:

  • Jung-Gu and Jongno-Gu – These two districts are what I would call the most central to Seoul sightseeing and shopping and right in the heart of the downtown area of Seoul. You’ll find many hotels in this area and it’s a great area to stay if you want easy access to the famous attractions without spending much time on the metro.
  • Myeongdong – Myeondong is one of the biggest shopping districts in Seoul, and it’s home to lots of restaurants, hotels and trendy fashion and nightlife. Stay in Myeongdong to be surrounded by shopping.
  • Seoul Station (Yongsan-Gu) – The area around Seoul Station is huge, and you’ll find both high end and lower end hotels. There’s not so much to do or see right at Seoul Station (although it’s very close to Namdaemun market and Myeondong), but it’s convenient for transportation.
  • Hongdae (Hongik University) – Hongdae is located in Western Seoul and it’s known especially for being a university town and therefore there’s plenty of shopping, restaurants, street food, and nightlife. It’s overall a great local area of Seoul and a fun area to walk around and explore. There are lots of guest houses in this area, so it’s a good place to looks for budget to mid-range accommodation.
  • Gangnam-Gu – Finally, there’s Gangnam, which is an area of Seoul that is known for being high end and very trendy. There are some very fancy and upscale hotels in this area.

Where did I stay?

Airbnb Rental (<- use that link for a $25 discount) – I’ve stayed at a number of hotels in Seoul, but on my latest trip, when my wife and I were writing this Seoul travel guide, we stayed at a rental apartment near Seoul Station. I think an apartment rental works quite well in Seoul, especially if you’re traveling with a group of friends or family so you can all be together and get a pretty decent deal.

Phil House – I also stayed at Phil House, a small and friendly hotel that’s clean and modern. The only problem is that it’s located a little far from central Seoul (but close to the Subway station), but it’s usually a pretty good price.

*NOTE: The link to hotels above are affiliate links, meaning that if you make a booking I will get a small commission at NO extra expense to you. Your support will help me continue making free travel guides like this. Thank you!

Seoul travel guide
Seoul travel and food guide – eating Korean bbq!

10 of My Favorite Korean Foods

I’m a huge fan of Korean food and especially the Korean feasts where a mind-blowing array of main and side dishes are placed on the table before you.

I’ve listed a few of my absolute favorite Korean foods I’ve tried so far, and dishes that you can find across Seoul and South Korea. This is not an extensive list, just a samplers platter of a few of my personal favorites.

  1. Banchan (side dishes) – Let’s begin with banchan, which is the name used to describe the multitude of Korean side dishes that can include all sorts of mini plates of pickles, chili marinated bits, fritters, and even sometimes little bites of leftovers. While a main dish might be the heart of Korean food, the banchan side dishes are the body, they make a meal function and make a meal complete. Kimchi is one of the most common banchan.
  2. Gamjatang (pork bone potato stew) – This soup is made with pork spine bones and potatoes which are boiled until the meat left is fall apart tender. You can usually order the kimchi version, which is absolutely sensational. Of all the food mentioned in this Seoul travel guide blog, this is one of my absolute favorite dishes.
  3. Gogigui (all things grilled meat) – One of the ultimate Korean meals are pieces of meat, grilled on your table before you with all the side dishes and dipping sauces. Korean barbecue is incredibly delicious.
  4. Sundubu Jjigae (kimchi stew) – Mainly made with un-curdled tofu and lots of red chili flakes, sundubu jjiggae is both spicy and richly flavorful. The tofu is so good it almost tastes likes scrambled eggs.
  5. Naengmyeon (type of noodles) – Of all the Korean noodle dishes, naengmyeon which is a type of buckwheat noodle with some other starches mixed in and served icy cold, is one of my personal favorites. The chewy texture and surprising icy-ness makes this dish fantastic.
  6. Samgyetang (ginseng chicken soup) – Known to be a health dish, but also really delicious, samgyetang is a Korean spring chicken ginseng soup. A whole young chicken is typically stuffed with rice and garlic, and boiled with ginseng and jujube.
  7. Godeungeo-gui (grilled fish) – Any chance that I can get to eat fish, I take it, as fish is one of my personal favorite things to eat. In Seoul you’ll find a dish called godeungeo-gui, which is grilled salted mackerel. The fish is usually nice and oily (full of delicious oils), and goes great with rice and kimchi.
  8. Mandu (dumplings) – Many cultures around the world have some kind of dumpling, and in Korea, mandu are meat and vegetable filled dumpling pockets. They can either be steamed or deep fried, and they are delicious either way.
  9. Hanjeongsik (full set meal) – Hanjeongsik, a Korean full set meal, is one of the ultimate Korean meal experiences. An array of food that will literally cover every square centimeter of your table is placed before you, including a mix of main and side dishes. It’s a dream come true for food lovers.
  10. Patbingsu (shaved ice dessert) – This last Korean food on the list is a dessert that is not my personal favorite, but it’s one of my wife’s favorites. The literal translation is red beans and ice, but they have become somewhat of a national and international Korean shaved ice phenomena full of bright and colorful toppings. Here are some of the famous places to eat patbingsu in Seoul.

Also, be sure to check out my more extensive list of top Korean food here.

Seoul travel food guide
Dakkochi – grilled Korean skewers of chicken is an amazing street food

Korean Street Food

When it comes to Korean street food in Seoul, there are both traditional snacks and also many modern trendy street foods.

I’m personally a huge fan of more of the traditional Korean street food dishes (ex. rice rolls, blood sausage), but not so much of a fan of the modern trendy things you’ll find on the streets and at shopping markets (ex. hot dogs, sweets).

Here’s a mix of some of the most common street foods you should try when you’re in Seoul.

  • Tteokbokki (rice cake rolls in chili sauce) – This is probably the most common Korean street food snack, which includes bite sized rice cakes braised in a tangy chili based sauce. You’ll find tteokbokki at countless street food stalls throughout Seoul, and it’s especially common for young people.
  • Gimbap (seaweed rice rolls) – This is one of the greatest Korean street food snacks in my opinion, Korean rice and seaweed rolls. The rolls can be filled with a combination of mostly vegetables, and what I really love about them is the common use of sesame seeds and sesame oil to give them a wonderful taste and aroma.
  • Dakkochi (grilled chicken skewers) – Another one of my favorite street foods featured in this Seoul travel guide are dakkochi, skewers of chicken and leek, grilled to perfection and either seasoned with salt or with red chili paste.
  • Twigim (deep fried nuggets) – Twigim can refer to a variety of bite sizes fritters, which are battered and deep fried. They are often compared as Korean tempura.
  • Odeng (oden) – Similar to Japanese oden, but called odeng in Korea, it consists of various fishcakes and vegetables on skewer boiled in dashi broth.
  • Hotteok (stuffed pancake) – Hotteok is a stuffed pancake that can either be sweet or savory. I’m partial to the salty version, sometimes filled with sweet potato noodles and bulgogi. They are oily and delicious.
  • Gamja dog (deluxe hot dog) – Yes, I had to end with the gamja dog, the creation that is a hot dog on a stick, covered in French fries.
Korean street food in Seoul
If you love food, you have to visit Gwangjang Market in Seoul

A few of must-visit places for street food in Seoul:

  • Gwangjang Market – One of the ultimate places for traditional Korean street food
  • Namdaemun Market – Snacks all over and busy environment
  • Myeong-dong – Lots of modern Korean street food, especially in the afternoon and evening
  • Dongdaemun Food Street – There’s a street with a bunch of Korean food stalls during the day, located at Dongdaemun Market.

When you’re walking around Seoul and if you see other street food snacks like steamed silk worms, water chestnuts, or fruit, be sure to give them a try!

Seoul food guide
Get ready to eat at lots of Korean restaurants in Seoul

Are you enjoying the photos in this guide? Check out the camera I use here.

Restaurants in Seoul

There are not only thousands of restaurants in Seoul, but there are literally thousands of really good restaurants in Seoul. So in this Seoul travel guide, I’m writing from my personal experience about restaurants and dishes that I enjoyed. However, I haven’t even come close to eating at a measurable percentage of all the restaurants in Seoul.

The point I want to make is: Don’t limit yourself to just the restaurants I’ve mentioned below, but do some research in the area you’re staying in and you’ll likely find similar restaurants.

If you see a good looking restaurant, check it out. It probably will be really good. Ok, now that I’ve said that, here are a few of the restaurants I ate at:

  1. Jaedong Sundubu – This place serves a seriously amazing bowl of sundubu jjiggae (soft tofu stew). Address: Bukchon-ro 2-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul, South Korea; How to get there: Take the subway to Anguk station and Exit #2.
  2. Bukchon Son Mandu – This famous restaurant in Seoul serves mandu dumplings, both steamed and fried, and an awesome bowl of naengmyeon, cold buckwheat noodles. Address: Branches in Insadong and within the Bukchon Hanok Village (original branch); Open hours: 11 am – 10 pm daily; Prices: About 5,000 – 10,000 Won ($4.27 – $8.53) per person.
  3. 예송숯불갈비 (for grilled meat, sorry not sure of the English name) – This is just a local typical neighborhood grilled meat restaurant near Seoul Station that serves both pork and beef. I liked it because it was friendly and no-frills, just good food and a nice atmosphere. Address: ; Open hours: 10:30 am – 11:30 pm daily; Another good option for grilled meat in Seoul is New Village Restaurant.
  4. Hanchu (한추 fried chicken and beer) – I got this restaurant recommendation from my friends Dan and Jeffrey of Foodiehub. Hanchu does crazy good fried chicken, and their trick is they add some pounded fresh chili to the batter. Address: 549-9 Sinsa-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul; Open hours: 5 pm – 3 am daily; Prices: One whole fried chicken is 17,000 Won ($14.50).
  5. Jinjujip (진주집) – Oxtail soup (kkori gomtang) is a dish that Koreans do very well, and while I enjoyed, it seemed to be overpriced. But never the less, it was pretty good. This place is located within the back alley of Namdaemun Market. Open hours: I’m not fully sure, but I think it’s mainly a lunch restaurant; How to get there: Namdaemun Market, take the metro to Hoehyeon Station, Exit 5; Price – 21,000 Won ($17.62) for the oxtail soup, which was very pricey.
  6. Gogung (고궁 – 인사동점) Bibimbap – Bibimbap is a famous Korean dish of rice and toppings all mixed together. When you’re in Insadong (there’s also a branch in Myeong-dong), this is a great place to try bibimbap. Address: 38 Gwanhun-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-300, South Korea; Open hours: 11 am – 9:30 pm daily; How to get there: Take the metro to Anguk Station, Exit 6.
  7. Dongdaemun Grilled Fish Street – Located near the Dongdaemun Market in the Pyeonghwa Market, there’s a street, more like a walking alley, that’s filled with grilled fish restaurants. They all looked pretty similar, and they all remain quite local. The fish was salty and grilled to perfection. How to get there: Take the metro to Dongdaemun Station, Exit 9, walk up the street to the market, and then cut into the alley.
  8. Namdaemun Hairtail Alley – Similar to the grilled fish alley, but this time within Namdaemun Market, there’s a hairtail fish alley where you’ll find a number of restaurants serving a spicy hairtail (cutlassfish) chili stew. I had it for the first time on this trip to Seoul, and it’s now one of my favorite Korean dishes. Open hours: throughout lunch and early evening, probably best to go at lunch, and some restaurants are closed on Sunday; How to get there: To get to Namdaemun market, take the metro to Hoehyeon Station, Exit 5.
  9. Gamjatang near Seoul Station – On this trip to Seoul, this was my first meal, as soon as my wife and I got to Seoul Station we were hungry. Just outside the station, across the street from Exit 15 is a nice neighborhood restaurant to eat gamjatang. How to get there: Seoul Station to Exit 15, cross the street and walk to your right hand side.

I’ve included most of these restaurants and everything within this Seoul travel guide on the Seoul map below (or you can look at it here)

Latest South Korea blog posts:

Here are some of the latest articles about food and travel in South Korea that I’ve published.

Seoul_travel_guide
A few of the top things to do when you’re in Seoul

Things To Do In Seoul

Here are a few of the top things to do when you’re in Seoul, when you’re in-between meals of course. Also, be sure to check out my more complete list of 25 things to do in Seoul.

  • Gwangjang Market – This old market is one of the greatest culinary destinations in all of Seoul, and if you love food, there’s absolutely no way you’re going to want to miss a chance to eat here. The market is set up with dozens of street food vendors that sell both snacks and full meals and you’ll find dishes like tteokbokki, gimbap, soondae, mung bean pancakes, and all sorts of fresh seafood. Gwangjang Market is the ultimate Seoul food destination. Even though it’s been written about in nearly all Seoul travel guides, it remains very local. Open hours: 9 am – 6 pm daily; How to get there: Take the subway to Jongno 5-Ga, Exit 8 or 9.
  • Noryangjin Fish Market – Another interesting place to go when you’re in Seoul is the Noryangjin Fisheries wholesale market, one of the biggest fresh seafood markets in Seoul. The amount and diversity of fresh seafood available is remarkable. You can walk around and just admire all the seafood creatures, and there are also restaurants within the market where you can buy seafood and have a restaurant cook it for you. Additionally they have freshly sliced raw fish (which is called hwareo hoe, like sashimi) that you can buy. Open hours: 24 hours, but anytime in the day is good; How to get there: Take the subway to Noryangjin station, Exit 7.
  • Gyeongbokgung Palace – The Gyeongbokgung Palace is probably the number attraction in Seoul according to most Seoul travel guide books, and it is worth a visit when you are there. Built in the Joseon dynasty in the 1300’s, it’s a huge complex of gates, walls, courtyards, and palaces. It’s such a huge area that it’s almost like a park, with ponds, bridges, and gardens. Open hours: 9 am – 6 pm from Wednesday – Monday, closed on Tuesday; Entrance price: 3,000 Won ($2.56); How to get there: Take the subway to Gyeongbokgung station Exit 5.
  • Bukchon Hanok Village – A hanok is the word for traditional Korean homes, and Bukchon Hanok is one of the best preserved traditional villages in Seoul. The village, although it’s still real and people still live there, has become a very popular tourist attraction for both foreigners and local Koreans. I think it’s a pretty nice area to just walk around leisurely, eat some food, and just enjoy the scenery. Open hours: business hours throughout the day and evening; How to get there: Take the metro to Anguk Station, Exit 2.
  • Changdeokgung Palace – Changdeokgung Palace was one of the main palaces during the Joseon Dynasty, and it remains one of the best preserved and most beautiful places in Seoul. The catch is that you have to join a tour to see it, so you’re not as free to walk around on your own terms. Open hours: 9 am – 6 pm from Tuesday – Sunday, closed on Mondays; Entrance price: 300 Won ($0.26) for entry into the palace ground, 3,000 Won($2.56) for entry and tour of the secret garden; How to get there: Take the subway to Anguk station, Exit 3.
  • Myeongdong Shopping – It seems that a lot of people come to Seoul for the shopping, and one of the most popular shopping destinations is the Myeongdong walking street (or entire neighborhood). You’ll mostly find clothes and cosmetics, but there are also some street shops and plenty of street food available especially in the afternoon and night.
  • Cheonggyecheon Stream – Walking and exercising in parks goes great with being a food traveler. I’m a huge fan of eating and then taking a stroll around the city without doing really anything but just walking and people watching. The Cheonggyecheon Stream is a 5.8 km long stream and walkway that runs adjacent to a busy road that goes right through the center of Seoul. It was formerly just a waterway, but the city breathed new life into it by cleaning it up and making it a public recreational park.
  • Namdaemun Market – This is another place I really enjoy in Seoul, and I included it in this Seoul travel guide not so much for the street shopping, but because it’s a great place to eat. There are some wonderful food alleys within the market, and also some great street food. Namdaemun Market is busy and hectic and a great environment. Open hours: Business daytime hours; How to get there: It’s easiest to get there from Hoehyeon Station and follow the clearly marked signs for Namdaemun Market.

This wraps up a few of my favorite things to do in Seoul. But in reality, I think the best thing to do is just walk around and explore the food!

how to get around Seoul
The Seoul Metro is very efficient

How To Get Around?

Seoul not only has one of Asia’s best and most extensive public metro transportation systems, but it’s one of the best city subway systems in the world.

There’s almost nowhere you can’t get to, even off the beaten path places, by taking the Seoul Metro, and walking a little ways.

how to get a t-money card in Seoul
Getting a T-money card makes life much easier

T-money Card

The T-money card is the all access pre-paid money card for transportation in Seoul, and buying one makes getting around much easier and quicker.

You can buy a T-money cards at most convenience stores like 7-Eleven or CU and you can re-load money at all subway stations.

The T-money card can cost 2,500 – 4,000 Won ($2.13 – $3.41) depending on where you buy it, and then you can add as much money at a time as you like. When you’re done with your T-money card, you can get a refund at convenience stores but they will take a 500 Won processing fee.

Even if you’re just staying in Seoul for a few days, a T-money card is well worth purchasing.

Main Modes of Transportation:

  • Seoul Metro – When you look at the Seoul Metro map, it looks pretty intense. And it is. But the good news is, it’s actually very easy to figure out and to use. Stations are well marked, and they’ve done a great job at managing crowds and stations. Just take your time, figure out your destination and the exit you want to take, and you can get almost anywhere in central Seoul using the metro. To pay, you can either buy a single ticket at the self service machine, or if you have a T-money card (which I’d recommend) you can add however much money onto your card and just swipe it to ride. Open hours: 5:30 am – 12 am midnight daily; Prices: 1,250 Won for a normal ride (with T-money card) or 1,350 Won without a T-money card, and then rates go up depending on distance.
  • Buses – Additionally, Seoul has an extensive bus network that you can use to get pretty much anywhere as well (if you know the route you need to take). You can use your T-money card to pay for bus rides as well. Here’s more information about riding the bus.
  • Taxis – Finally, if you need to get somewhere quickly or if the Metro has already closed, taxis in Seoul are always available. Taxis in generally are pretty good, but make sure they use the meter and make sure you have a bit of an idea where you’re going. You can even use your T-money card to pay for taxis. Here are some good taxi tips. Prices: 3,000 Won ($2.56) is the base price and then goes up by distance.

Public transportation in Seoul is excellent, extensive, and you can get about anywhere you need to go just with the Seoul metro.

Seoul parks
One of my favorite things about Seoul is the nature

Prices and Expenses

I would classify Seoul as a pretty expensive city to visit, similar to Tokyo or Singapore. And also, the cost of living in Seoul is very high.

Accommodation will likely be your biggest expense when traveling to Seoul, and unless you have a friend you can stay with, there’s no great way around expensive accommodation (even hostels are pricey). That being said, you can find budget food and both attractions and transportation are pretty affordable.

Here are some sample prices and expenses for Seoul:

Accommodation:

  • Hostel dorm bed: $20 – $35 USD per night
  • Mid-range hotel or guest house: $50 – $150 USD per night
  • High end: Everything over $150 and way over

Transportation:

  • Seoul Metro Ride: 1,250 Won ($1.05) for a normal ride
  • Taxi: 8,000 – 15,000 Won ($6.82 – $12.80) for a short rice, 15,000 – 30,000 Won ($12.80 – $25.60) for a longer ride

Food:

  • Street food dish: 1,000 – 3,000 Won ($0.84 – $2.52)
  • Local restaurant: 5,000 – 10,000 Won ($4.20 – $8.39) per dish or person
  • Indoor restaurant: 10,000 – 15,000 Won ($8.39 – $12.59) won per person
  • Nicer sit down restaurant: 15,000 Won ($12.59) and up per person
  • Drink at a bar: 3,000 – 5,000 Won ($2.56 – $4.27)
  • Coffee at coffeeshop: 2,000 – 5,000 Won ($1.68 – $4.20)
  • Big bottle of water: 1,500 Won ($1.28)

Overall money budget:

  • Budget: $30 – $65 USD per person per day
  • Mid-range: $65 – $100 USD per person per day
  • High end: $100 – $300 per person per day

This is not an exact guide, but just meant to give you an idea of the kind of prices you can expect to pay when you visit Seoul.

gimbap
These are known as “Narcotic Rice Rolls,” because they are so addictive.

South Korea Travel Videos:

I’ve traveled to Seoul a number of times, but the series of videos below is from my most recent trip, where my wife Ying and I spent 6 days in Seoul and then traveled onwards to Jeonju (another amazing Korean food destination by the way).

Most of the things included in this guide are featured in this playlist of Seoul travel videos:

(Or you can watch the full playlist here)

Seoul travel guide
Seoul Travel Guide for Food Lovers!

Conclusion

Seoul is a huge and modern city in South Korea, home to never ending shopping, historical attractions, a thriving art and design scene, and an abundance of delicious food that will keep you occupied for as long as you stay.

In this Seoul Travel Guide for Food Lovers we’ve covered information and tips on where to stay, how to get around, and Korean food and restaurants.

I hope this guide will give you some great ideas for your trip so that you can make the most of your time in Seoul and eat some seriously amazing food!

Have you been to Seoul? Any extra tips?

I’d love to hear from you now in the comments section below. Leave a comment!

Was this Seoul travel guide helpful for you?

If you’d like to help me continue making free guides and videos, here are 3 ways you can help:

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135 comments. I'd love to hear from you!

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  • Abhishek

    2 months ago

    Thanks for sharing very nice blog about Seoul Travel Guide for Food Lovers.

    • Mark Wiens

      2 months ago

      You’re welcome, glad it’s helpful Abhishek!

  • Yuen Mi

    3 months ago

    Great guide. So very informative! Seoul’s such a great city for food lovers, their street food is just off the chart amazing. I also love how their restaurant menu is perfect for two people. My sister and I always just order one meal and share among ourselves.

  • Terry Frederick

    4 months ago

    Hi Mark
    Me and my husband are going to korea next year April I am interested in hiring guide you have used to visit Gunsan,and Jeonju, can you give me more information about that and what was the cost of it.

  • Salina Dai

    4 months ago

    Hi Mark.
    Me and my friends are going t Korea during this summer. My question is do you give tip when you are out eating or taking the taxi? I know some countries have i included but I´m from Sweden so here the tipping is free of will so to speak.
    Also wanted to say that I love your videos on the food and the info on the countries you go to. While watching you videos it feel that it´s quite safe to travel around and that it don´t have to be so expansive while traveling. Keep up the good work!
    Beast regards/

    Salina

    • J

      4 months ago

      Hello! I am not Mark but I think I can answer your question. To answer your question, no. You do not have to tip. If you really really want to, you can, but generally there is no tipping culture in Korea. I would say the most common “tipping-ish” culture we have is telling the taxi driver to keep the change.
      I hope you enjoy your trip!
      J

    • robin

      4 months ago

      I am korean 🙂 there is no tip culture any where in korea. eating or taking a taxi : nope,no tip ever!. we don’t even have a word “tip”.

  • Lucy Lee

    6 months ago

    Hi Mark,

    First if all, I want to say I love your videos! Especially when Ying is it with you! You two are soo cute together. But I do want to ask moreabout the trains. When arriving if I take the all stop train is there a spot I could put my luggage in or do I carry it along sidewith me in the train?

    • gichang kwon

      6 months ago

      As far as I know there is no way to put your luggage in so, you should keep your luggage at hand if you take all-stop train. You can check out the details of Incheon airport trains here: http://www.arex.or.kr/main.do

  • Pasio Lee

    7 months ago

    Wow~ Fantastic!!:) It’s really so helpful. When I traveled to Seoul, Korea, I played with Korean local friends who are sooooo kind and really soooooo funny. I want to share the website tourmatekorea.kr ! Enjoy your Trip!:)

  • Mhike

    7 months ago

    Which airline did you take from BKK to Seoul? Thanks

  • Rahma Mardiana

    8 months ago

    Hi Mr. Wiens,
    I am going to Seoul next April 2017 but I really hardly find halal food or non pork (and any processed of it) food in Seoul . When I was travelling there last February 2016, I only found halal food in Ittaewon Mosque neighbourhood…I wonder if you have other “save” food recomendation for moslem like me and if you do..please inform me. Thank You Mr. Wiens

  • Felicia

    9 months ago

    Hi Mark,
    I ‘m curious , is in Korea , they expect you to order main dish for every person?
    I’m planning to visit Seoul and Jeonju with my husband. And we’re planning to satisfied our bud taste with various kind of korean foods and snacks.
    I’m wondering if , maybe I’m allowed do buy just one main dish and share it with my husband, so that we’re not too full to try another food..?
    Thank you

    • yubi

      7 months ago

      Hi Felicia, I was exploring the website and coincidentally saw your comment. I am from Korea and wanted to help you w your question. Culturally, they do expect you to order main dishes by the number of people but you can easily mention one of yall isn’t hungry and they will understand. But if you want to grill BBQ, you should order more than one person.

      • Mark Wiens

        7 months ago

        Huge thank you for your help and insight Yubi!

      • Felicia

        6 months ago

        Hi Yubi, thank you for your information. ^_^

  • Yoki

    10 months ago

    Hi Mark ,

    Me and my husband great food lovers we seen you in video watching what you eat make us really really hungry love your video and love your blogs we going to Seoul in a week times we definitely will be looking for the places that you went to in Seoul, however do you have any suggestion or any advice regards eating. Thank you 😋

  • alfian

    10 months ago

    I seemed to find the best web

  • James

    11 months ago

    Hi Mark , going to Seoul and Jeonju in December , was wondering if you would post more on Jeonju . I have already watched your vlogs and it’s amazing ! Love your vids ! 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      10 months ago

      Hey James, thank you very much, and great to hear that. I have been meaning to post more on Jeonju, just haven’t got around to it yet. Will try to soon. Thanks!

  • Eric

    12 months ago

    Thanks for your videos. You really did an awesome job with your trip to Korea. I’ve been there a couple times and I can’t explain all the good times and food there. I started liking their culture and food as well as the safe and peaceful environment. There’s definitely a lot to see in Seoul alone. Kpop and K. Dramas just adds to the flavour of everything. Can’t really express how much I like Korea and I’ll definitely go there over and over again. I hope you’ll enjoy the foods wherever you go. Keep up the good videos. P.S. You should also checkout “Cory & Marie’s” channel in Seoul. They also make amazing vlogs walking the streets of Seoul.

  • Steven

    12 months ago

    I love watching your videos. Your guide is great and I will be using that for my trip to South Korea.

  • Ari

    12 months ago

    We love your vlogs! You make my husband and I aspire to travel to the places you go to get the same experiences and tastes that you enjoyed at all your destinations! We too will soon be traveling Hong Kong, Macau, Beijing and Seoul. Your vlogs and food guides are priceless! I’m particularly interested about your guide in South Korea. Can you give me a reference?

    • Mark Wiens

      12 months ago

      Hey Ari, thank you very much, really appreciate you and your husband watching our videos. Sounds like a fantastic trip you have coming up. I haven’t done too much traveling in South Korea yet except for Seoul and Jeonju.

  • Lilian

    12 months ago

    First off, I absolutely love watching your videos! They are so helpful & amazing, and I can’t wait to travel to a lot of places on my bucket list. I know you are traveling with your wife but I also notice you’re traveling with some other guy or people. Are they like some sort of translator or some kind of tour guide person? Thank you!

    • Mark Wiens

      12 months ago

      Hey Lilian, thank you very much. During our time in Seoul we were by ourselves, but in Jeonju, we were invited by the center for foreign affairs and so we had a guide / translator, and a driver with us.

      • Lilian

        12 months ago

        Ooh okay, thanks for the info! I will love to go visit Seoul sometime in the future, especially during their cherry blossom season. This guide will help a lot and in this case, did you prefer either traveling by yourself with your wife or actually having a guide/translator to help you along with suggesting places for you guys to eat at?

  • Lydia Abernathy

    12 months ago

    Hi Mark..Thank You for Sharing Your Awesome videos I watch every day..I was wondering if you had the exact recipe for the medicinal Tea You and Ying had?? I watch that one frequently.. It looks so peaceful with the music on in the Tea Cafe..also what’s the name of that place because its in Korean on the pic..Love Y’all bunches.. Keep doing what Y’all do..Pure Awesomeness 😊👍🙏

    • Mark Wiens

      12 months ago

      Hey Lydia, thank you very much, really appreciate your support. Unfortunately I didn’t get that tea recipe, and I think it was their sort of secret family recipe. If you can do some translating you might be able to research the tea in Korean: Ssanghwa cha (쌍화차) for a recipe. Thanks again for watching!

      • lee hyeon suk

        8 months ago

        i hope some kind and freindly korean reply this comment but there is no one reply, as a korean ssanghwa tea is good for cold season just like now a days especillay when winter season usually drink and if we have cold and feaver we drink often.it make body become warm and feel fresh.12 ingridients i dont know english name but i use google translate it is not work i am so sad, i think mark you can get that in china town bang kok i remember, come to kroea ready made tea here and ingridients also i am gonna send not so expensive haha

  • Ryan Davison

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark, I’ve just signed up. We are visiting South Korea from Wednesday 17th. We are doing a mini tour, Seoul then on to Busan, then Osaka and finally Kyoto for 2 weeks. Ive been working my way some of the videos. If you had to select ‘must do’ restaurants in each of those locations what would they be? Tough one I am sure. Will keep watching the vids in any case! Good work. Ryan

  • Sanjeet Veen

    1 year ago

    Buddhist temples, palaces and pagodas, Seoul is a fascinating mix of old and new. A hub of business, culture and finance both within South Korea and internationally.

  • Ash

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark – thanks for all your tips I love your blog. I have three days in Korea after wrapping up a conference there next week, would you recommend I stay and explore Seoul, or head to Jeonju for the two and a bit days? The conference is in Seoul but I won’t have the chance to leave the venue, and want to eat as much as possible in the remaining days 🙂 Thanks for your advice!

  • Lisa B

    1 year ago

    Thank you, Mark – for your videos & blog about Seoul, Jeonju & other places in S. Korea! They’re so timely…My sis & I are travelling there in October – my first time back home in over 4 decades – and your information is helping us formulate our itinerary. We added Jeonju because of you! And all of the extra info you provide from time to get somewhere, the approximate prices, and description of the food, locations & attractions – all invaluable!
    We love your friendly, smiling face & your love for the foods, people & places – it comes through in your videos. Keep up the awesome videos/blog! Hope to see a little bit more of Ying in the videos, too – thank you!

  • Dee Reid

    1 year ago

    hello Ying and Mark……thanks alot for sharing your Travel Videos, you are doing a Great Job!!!!! My Head is full of Holiday Ideas ! Asia is Amazing,

  • Lisna Wong

    1 year ago

    I love the way you work and enjoy at the same time. Your videos and blogs are very detailed and informative. And you even send emails to your subscribers in such a personalised way. I appreciate it! Please continue making great videos for us and stay healthy and safe! Thank you, Mark&Ying!

  • Jay Hwang

    1 year ago

    예송숯불갈비 would be Yesong Sutbul Galbi in Latin alphabet. Sutbul means charcoal flame in Korean, so Sutbul Galbi is charcoal-grilled galbi. Korean oak charcoal removes bad smells of meat and adds amazing flavor to it. Using charcoal is the most favorite way to grill meat to me and many other koreans.

  • Pohan

    1 year ago

    Very Nice Place Bro… good food… good people… we should try original koreab Kimchi at Korean.. some of my friend say its so different.. so tasty. Good for u. Cant wait ur next trip… Happy Hunting…

    • jarvis

      1 year ago

      thanks

  • Alina Jack

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing a complete guide on Seoul. I am a travel lover and foody too. I also read your grilled fish post. That pictures are amazing and make me craving for my favorite fish curry.

  • flavio lombardi

    1 year ago

    Hello Mark! Great Post!
    I always wanted to go to Korea, what are the best times to go during the year when it comes to the weather? Thanks

    • VT Collaço

      1 year ago

      It Is better & better on your travel & eat. I want to go as you have offer the best tips for older woman travel alone and with confidence. Thanks

  • Karyn

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark,
    wished I had seen your videos before heading to Seoul. Nevertheless, I had an awesome solo trip recently. Your videos and info will help me prepare for my next visit, soon!

  • Cindy

    1 year ago

    Mark,

    Another great post! We are planning to visit Korea soon and this post just made it more exciting for us! Your pictures are so visually awesome and your narrative just as great! Looking forward to reading about your next adventure! Bon appetite!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Cindy, thank you very much. Great to hear you’re planning a visit to South Korea soon!

  • Kim

    1 year ago

    The best travel guide I’ve read so far! Thanks for the amazing work, Mark! I’m going to Korea next week and this will really help me and my friends. 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Kim, awesome to hear that. Have a fun time in Korea!

  • eddy

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark,
    Wow, wonderful and very detail information.
    I really like it and thank you Mark.

  • Michaela Maestas

    1 year ago

    We enjoy following your videos , I enjoy getting your updates . I am starting to blog . I just started this week. I am going slow . I am picking a subject and / or a theme and write i little story about it. I have had writer’s block for 22 years. My writings in the past were used against me in court , during a divorce . Ugh ! Anyways now trying to get back into the swing of it .
    Thanks for all that you do each and everyday. You set a great example .
    Now I need to learn new updated skills so I can have a daily flow on Youtube .
    Thanks
    Peace and Blessings to you and your wife !
    Michaela and Ernesto Maestas
    Mother Bosque Gardens
    87104
    I can be found on FB ,, looking to branch out of just Facebook and spread my knowledge around .
    We love to travel. I have wanted to go to Asian my whole life ! thanks again !
    You are so encouraging !
    Albuquerque , New Mexcio 87104

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Michaela, great to hear from you, thank you for your kind words and for sharing your story. Keep up with the blog and videos, just let the blogs flow from your own personality. Thanks!

  • Pamela Mukherjee

    1 year ago

    Amazing post. I loved the pictures of Seol. Mind blowing pictures. Which camera u were using to take those snaps? Did you use any photo editing tool?

  • Bizbees

    1 year ago

    Hi, Mark.
    I have been following you through your videos and blogs for 2 years and finally you made a video and blog about Korea which is my home country.
    My first impression about your video and blog about Korea is that you know better about Korea than me, especially about Korean food.
    I really thank you for sharing this information and I will definitely recommend your videos and blogs to people who want travel information about Korea because your video and blog is the best of the bests for practical travel information for Korea.
    Great work, Mark.
    And I will look forward to your next videos and blogs.
    Thank you.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Great to hear from you, thank you very much for reading and for your encouraging words. Do you go back to visit Korea often?

      • Bizbees

        1 year ago

        Usually, I visited Korea once in two years and I have a plan to visit Korea this winter.
        Once I visit there then I usually stay there for at least 3 months.
        If you have a plan to visit Korea this winter, then we may have a meetup for Korean food.
        Do you have a plan to revisit Korea this winter? If you have, just let me know so that we meet each other in Korea.

  • Becky

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing this guide! I will be going to Seoul, Korea for the first time this coming November and I am so glad for your write up and sharing! 😀

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Becky, you’re welcome, thank you for reading. Great to hear you’ll be going to Seoul soon!

  • Mac cango

    1 year ago

    Finding this write ups is very timely…i am traveling to Seoul next month and though I have personally mapped my activities using google and tourist information this remain a big part…the food!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Mac, great to hear that, hope you have an amazing trip!

  • Abdirizak Osman

    1 year ago

    Like you, I love to travel often, but before I go anywhere its must a checkout Mark’s YouTube vlogs and guides. And they’re the best I have seen so far, keep up the good work Mark!

  • ally siti

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark
    Just wonder how come you can still have this awesome blog after doing some great travelling, eating and youtubing as well.

    Great job Mark.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Ally, thank you very much. I’m trying to balance with the videos and blogging!

  • silvato

    1 year ago

    Thanks Mark and Yin for the new guide. I can see the food portions placed on each table. But Is it slow food quickly delivered or rapid food delivery? Don’t know yet but yes interesting Korean culture. Nice videos as well.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Silvato, thank you very much. The food is delivered very quickly, usually the side dishes are within a minute, and and main dishes a couple minutes.

  • kim garcia

    1 year ago

    I hope you and Ying get to go to jeju island…it could be your second honeymoon..it’s consider koreas’ answer to hawaii…beautiful and great tea places…my daughter taught English there..I’m korean. Bless both of you 😊

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Kim, thank you very much. We weren’t able to go on this trip, but would love to go sometime in the future.

  • Mark Gomez

    1 year ago

    Just a little error in your description of the Changdeokgeung Palace. W300 is the entry to the palace grounds. ONLY IF you wish to tour the Secret Garden (BiWon) you will have to join the tour. It is an extra W3000 and tours are available in several languages at set times. However, having been on four different language tours of the BiWon, I would recommend just taking the next available language tour, as the commentary is rather dry and dull. You will be there to marvel at the scenery and architecture, not who was born where and when and how many warring sons they had.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Mark, great tips and information, thank you for sharing.

  • Lân

    1 year ago

    Thanks for your email Mark
    Its so great…Im so excited and waiting for your new videos in Seoul soon

  • jim

    1 year ago

    Good work as always, Korea is on my list. on many viewers you have altogether?

  • H.L. Suprobowati

    1 year ago

    Yes, finally Seoul.
    I must say I myself was there last month on a conference, I went to Jeju, but I made the time to stay in Seoul for a day, and yes its a food paradise, the restaurants were nice and mostly large portioned, hygenic, and mostly in no need for additional beverages (for me) since they serve free mineral waters. What’s also free flowing was their side dishes! After I went back I find myself keep on buying kimchis for my meals..since its become a habit (I stayed there for a week). Even halal restaurants there tasted nice (a nice Indian and Tibetian Restaurant in Myeong Dong by the Cheonggyechon stream).
    My favourites are bibimbap, sundubu jjigae, and their sushis and raw octopus served in yellowish sauce I wasn’t sure what it was (perhaps a little help on the naming here Mark, please) It was fresh and chewy and I love it so much.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi H.L. great to hear from you and glad you enjoyed your recent visit to South Korea so much. The sauce I think you’re talking about is sesame oil possibly? Thanks!

  • Henry lim

    1 year ago

    Good morning mark, it a great sharing because we plan to go Korea in Jan 2016. This is the first time we plan to hv a free n easy trip and this information come at the right time . The foods look so delicious especially the pork rib. thks again

  • Jaein Park

    1 year ago

    Thanks for the information. I’ve enjoyed your posts for a couple of years now and you’re in my country this time!
    Even as Korean, your posts are helpful.
    Since you wrote that you like Pat bing su(shaved ice with red beans), I highly recommend the So Jeok Du(소적두) in Samcheong-dong, near the Kyungbok Palace.
    What we consider as a good Pat bing su is whether or not the red bean paste is made by the cafe or not.
    This place makes the best red bean pasts, not too sweet, it’s just perfect.
    And I also like the atmosphere, the architecture of the place and the best part is its dishes and spoons!(Korean traditional style)
    So, if you’re still in Korea and haven’t tried the place yet, why don’t you try it?
    (Address : Seoul, Jongno-gu, Sogyeok-dong, 121)

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Jaein, thank you very much, and I appreciate your pat bing su recommendation. I’m not in Seoul anymore, but I will definitely remember for next time, I know for sure my wife will love it too. Thank you again!

  • Hyekyeong Kate

    1 year ago

    I’m Korean and this information can’t be more accurate and detailed! This is an amazing post!
    Thank you for sharing! Every food you mention is my favorite too. For the food #5 Naengmyeon, if you like spicy food you can try spicy version of it too. Thanks again!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Hyekyeong, thank you very much. Mm, that sounds delicious!

  • Anna Lai

    1 year ago

    Love the info you provided above. My husband and I were in Seoul in April. It would have been great to have had your guide with us. Nevertheless we did a lot of what you wrote about and we love every minute of our week there. The only thing I found that can be really frustrating was our inability to read Korean. We tried to follow guidebooks with recommendations of where to eat, but even with a detailed map it was hard to find the exact place because there is usually no English name anywhere. We could be standing in the right block but wouldn’t know which restaurant to go into. It would really be helpful if the Korean names of restaurants are included so at least one can try to match the writing or show someone when asking for directions. Thanks for your great research, it is much appreciated.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Anna, thank you very much, and great to hear you were recently in Seoul. That’s a very good point, and I also had the same challenges. I definitely did a lot of photo matching with Korean script as well. I’ll be covering some of these restaurants on individual posts, and will be able to add more photos. Thanks again!

      • Pamela

        11 months ago

        Although I am lucky enough to speak Korean, courtesy of the US Army and was stationed there for 2 years I’d like to point out that Korean script is very easy to learn. My first day at DLI (Defense Language Institute in Monterey, CA where most military go to learn languages) after a morning of general orientation we finally went to our classrooms and met our teacher. After introductions he told us to go to lunch and when we came back he’d teach us to read Korean. I remember one of my classmates saying “you mean you’ll START to teach us to read Korean” He said no, by the time you go home today you’ll be able to read Korean. And he was right! Of course we had no idea what we were reading, but we could read it. My Mom visited me for one month in Korea and after the first week she could read signs and that was with just some informal instruction from me. Get on Amazon or something and get a basic book on Korean writing or find a basic Korean language website. It’s not like Chinese. It is the world’s only scientifically developed script. For more on that get on Wikipedia and read the story of King Sejong. Unlike scripts that developed over time there is a definite structure to it. While it’s not an alphabet, it is a very easy syllabary. With just a few hours study I’m sure most people could pick it up easily. It’s certainly no more difficult than learning basic words and phrases in any language like many people do before traveling. If you are going to be in Korea for more than a few days I think it would be well worth the effort to learn the script. Good luck!

        • Mark Wiens

          11 months ago

          Hi Pamela, thank you for sharing your isights and your story. I had heard that Korean was relatively easy to learn how to read, but that’s awesome to hear it first hand. That’s a great tip for visiting Korea as well. Knowing how to read Korean could be very useful. Thanks!

  • Raymond Leong

    1 year ago

    Mark as I mentioned from 7 years ago I have come to love Korea be it my car my appliances at home my phone and just simply the culture people and of course the food. That was from my first trip some 7 years ago and since then I dont believe I have ever miss a year when I did not fly from Singapore to Korea on my vacation. Because of her food i have to love her K pop and K drama too.
    What surprises me most is that quite a bit of the info here I never knew and I will surely will keep it for my next trip to Korea likely in Spring next year.
    Thank you Mark. You make this world a little better for all of us so God bless.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Raymond, thank you very much, and that’s awesome to hear. Thank you for your support!

  • Claire

    1 year ago

    Seoul is such a fun city! Thx for the food tips, as always.
    Where I live, we often have layovers at Incheon and a very cool discovery I just made is that as long as you have a few hours to spare, travelers can avail themselves of Free guided tours of popular visiting destinations! There are tours to Seoul, to Incheon city, to temple, etc. that vary in duration (1.5 hrs, 3hrs, 5 hrs..) according to what you can spare. Search for “Korea Transit tour” or visit http://english.visitkorea.or.kr/enu/SI/SI_EN_3_5_1.jsp

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Claire, that’s a great tip, thank you very much for sharing!

  • Wanda Ernstberger

    1 year ago

    By the way, you asked in your last video for suggestions on where to eat on your next trip. In Hong Kong, don’t miss the restaurants at the end of the Temple Street Night Market. They’re small family run places with tables on the sidewalk and plastic stools, my favorite kind of dining. Check out the choy sum, burdock stir fried with chunks of garlic. Yum!

  • Wanda Ernstberger

    1 year ago

    Thanks for the helpful guide, Mark. I love your videos! I can’t wait to follow you around the world on your next journey.

  • Ralph P Cohen aka Ralphie Boy

    1 year ago

    Mark are these trips sponsored or in part? I look forward to all of your ventures of food and sightseeing I’m giving this a triple thumbs up for the gals!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Ralph, the trip to Seoul was not sponsored. But coming up after Seoul we went to Jeonju as guests of the Jeonbuk Center for International Affairs. Will try to write a guide about Jeonju as well, the food was amazing there.

  • Irene Weintre

    1 year ago

    Again mouthwatering, full of good and practical information. Addresses where to stay etc.
    You’re really doing your thing with your heart Mark and that is what you radiate!
    I experienced Korean Food in Singapore and I really love it.
    I rest my case.
    VERY good article!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Irene, really appreciate your encouraging words, and thank you for reading. Glad you enjoy Korean food!

  • Shery

    1 year ago

    man u r awsum and just loved the way u explained it seriously ur passion is on another level mark if u have time plz do like try to get little info about HALAL food available in seoul other then that it was a delight to read and watch ur videos awsum maan 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Shery, thank you very much. I will plan to cover more Halal restaurants in the future. Thanks!

      • Shery

        1 year ago

        Sure man and thanks 😁😁

    • Kel

      1 year ago

      I was in Seoul 2 yrs ago and i greatly enjoyed winter there since i come from south east asia. Im not muslim but since i was travelling with my muslim friends, there are a few halal restaurants in Myeongdong, most of them are in Itaewon. Plus most of the halal restaurants were indian, pakistani or turkish restaurants. i even remembered the delicious spicy kebab from the halal kebab stall in myeondong and also the street food was to die for! i personally loved the pomegranate drink mixed with 7up and teokbokki! another interesting thing to try in korea, i thought, was hot fruit juice! Fruit juices are normally served cold where i come from 🙂 The only thing i didn’t like was the staircases and the hills! they’re everywhere!!! hehehehe

  • Kaye L.

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing! I was thinking of adding a visit to South Korea to my Japan vacation next year. Finding delicious food is an important part of travelling for me, so I am happy to have this guide to review before my trip!

  • Pratim Ray

    1 year ago

    Thank you for sharing your experience. Very nice post.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Pratime, you’re welcome, thank you for reading.

  • Peggy M.E. Postma

    1 year ago

    I am loving this trip Mark, to Seoul Korea……all the food looks fantastic……! My son Tony and I have eaten here in Southern California in Korean Restaurants and love their food as well….! I loved the Video you had on this site, from the moment you sat on the plane ….. I will talk to you later again….!

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Petty, thank you very much, really appreciate your support. Say hello to Tony as well!

  • Albert

    1 year ago

    Wife & I will be in Vietnam November this year, I took notes from your video
    Thanks will send you info when we get back.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hey Albert, great to hear that, hope you have an amazing trip!

  • MR Antony Vaughan

    1 year ago

    HI Mark, my wife and I have been following you’re travels for a while now we enjoy you’re videos and have filled in most of the questions you have ask your subscribers to fill in. And we have a question for you: where would you suggest is another place to vist in Thailand away from Bangkok that is food oriented, somen thing similar to HoI An in Vietnam. Does a place excist? The last time I was in Thailand was over 30 years ago to I’m pretty much out of touch. Many Thanks Antony

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Antony, great to hear from you, thank you for your support. Somewhere I would really recommend is Lampang – it’s a great little city, not far from Chiang Mai, and they have some wonderful markets and restaurants. Thanks for all your help!

      • Antony

        1 year ago

        Thank you Mark.

  • Arjan Peen

    1 year ago

    Hi Mark,

    Great work! Almost makes me want to change destinations hahaha, almost! 😉
    Nice to see you’re taking suggestions to heart, seeing that map with all the spots on it. Very handy!

    Best regards,
    Arjan.

  • Peggy M.E. Postma

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing Seoul, Korea……
    Everything looks beautiful, and the food looks delicious…… I will check it all better later on.

  • Jasmin

    1 year ago

    Thanks Mark for sharing! Your new video is great – I really enjoy your vlogging!

  • Suzy

    1 year ago

    Thanks for making this guide – it was just what I was looking for. I’m heading to Seoul for the first time next year and now I’m hoping to add a side trip to Jeonju 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Suzy, thank you for reading, glad you’ll be going to South Korea soon. Jeonju was amazing, will be posting more about it soon.

    • Mia

      1 year ago

      Jeonjoo has stronger & deeper flavour food than othet cities in south korea. As a korean, I think Jeonjoo kimchi is the best.

    • Mia

      1 year ago

      Jeonju has stronger & deeper flavour food than othet cities in south korea. As a korean, I think Jeonjoo kimchi is the best.

  • George Woo

    1 year ago

    IMO you have the BEST travel/food videos on you tube
    also the correct pronunciation, of foods is a bonus
    keep up the good work

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi George, thank you very much. Pronunciation is something I’m always a bit worried about, because sometimes I’m really not sure, but I do try my hardest to pronounce things correctly. Thank you!

  • Aniket Deshmukh

    1 year ago

    HI Mark, thanks for sharing, I think you should try Andong Jjimdak next time, I am Indian working in Korea these days, planning to start a food blog just like you, Keep writing. Happy eating

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Aniket, great to hear from you, thank you for the recommendation. Next time will definitely check it out!

  • Deddy bagus

    1 year ago

    Thks alot mark for your infirmation ..keep traveling n enjoy the food

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Deddy, you’re welcome, thank you for reading.

  • Riska Sari

    1 year ago

    Really nice travel tips. But since Korea is really famous for their dog meat eating culture, how to know that the meat you eat not dog meat?
    this thought scare me. Thanks.

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Riska, thank you very much. I think typically dog is served in specific only restaurants, so it’s not likely that you’d go into a normal restaurant and risk it. Also, you can easily just make note of the Korean words for chicken, beef, pork, and copy the Korean script so you can compare. It’s something you don’t need to worry about if you’d like to visit Korea.

  • Vincent

    1 year ago

    Another great post making many of us salivating ! Thanks for sharing Mark !

  • Hanny Pengilley

    1 year ago

    Thanks for sharing , everything looks so yummy ,Love to watch alll your videos and they are very helpfull . We will be in Bangkok on the 28 nov Would be cool if we run in to you somewhere , someday .

    • Mark Wiens

      1 year ago

      Hi Hanny, thank you very much. Great to hear you’ll be coming to Bangkok soon!