Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek – The Ultimate Guide and Itinerary

By Mark Wiens 131 Comments
Breathtaking scenery on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek in Nepal!
Breathtaking scenery on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek in Nepal!

At 3,210 meters, the Poon Hill sunrise view of the snowy rugged Annapurna Himalaya range, was worth every grueling step it took to get there!

Having the Himalayas close up, literally almost in my face, was a breathtaking sight!

The Ghorepani Poon Hill trek is a 4 – 5 day hike in the Annapurna mountain range in Nepal. It takes a moderate level of fitness to complete, and the max elevation is 3,210 meters (so there’s no real risk of altitude sickness). Pokhara is the closest main access city to begin treks into the Annapurna range.

For the first part of this guide I’ll share our itinerary of what we did and where we hiked each day.

Then below the day overviews you’ll find all the information about how we prepared and arranged the trek, including costs and everything we spent.

We did the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek in mid-March 2013, which is low season, and it was still quite cold (probably got down a little below freezing when we reached Ghorepani). Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek can be done year round, but in the thick of winter there might be quite a lot of snow and ice on the trail.

Alright, now onto the guide…

Lovely village of Tikhedunga
Lovely village of Tikhedunga

Day 1 – Nayapul to Tikhedunga

Starting at about 8 am from Pokhara (the main closest town to the Annapurna Himalaya range), we took a taxi (taxi cost us 1,500 Nepali Rupees) to Nayapul to begin the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek.

The first day trekking was quite easy, and we mostly made our way gradually uphill walking along a gravel road. We stopped for lunch at Green Land Restaurant, a small house restaurant that was about the only option for food in the area. I chose vegetarian dal bhat for lunch, a combination of rice, dal, and vegetables. It was good and they offered as much rice as I could eat for 300 Rupees.

We continued hiking for another few hours, the road finally turning into more of a trail.

After arriving in the village of Tikhedunga, we checked into Tikhedunga Guest House, a beautiful lodge with a nice view and the sound of a waterfall in the distance. Our double room cost just 350 Rupees.

For dinner, I ordered a plate of white plain rice (150 Rupees), and a plate of stir fried veg noodles (270 Rupees), and also popped open a can of fish I had brought with me. I then had a cup of tea (50 Rupees) for dessert.

Water was available for re-fill for 60 Rupees per liter.

We slept early on Day 1 of the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek in order to wake up early the next morning.

Total trekking time – about 5-6 hours

Getting our first glimpses of the snowy Himalayas
Getting our first glimpses of the snowy Himalayas

Day 2 – Tikhedunga to Ghorepani

On Day 2 we woke up quite early, about 6 am, and ate breakfast. I personally ate muesli, which I had carried with me, in order to save money (video) on food. I ate a few cups of muesli cereal along with water for breakfast.

This day’s hike was quite challenging, we walked straight up the face of the mountain for about 4 hours, eventually catching glimpses of the white snow capped Annapurna peaks.

The views were amazing!

For lunch we stopped at a small little house. I saw the sukuti (dry buffalo) hanging in the outdoor kitchen above the fire and I couldn’t resist ordering a huge plate full. After chopping it into small pieces, she fried it up with some onions and spices and served it to me along with rice and dal. It was marvelous, and all I could eat for 400 Rupees.

After lunch and an hour of rest, we continued hiking. After about 3 hours we reached the cold Ghorepani village.

At Ghorepani we checked in to Dhaulagiri Lodge, located right at the top of the village in the main square area. They charged 300 Rupees for our room and 100 Rupees for a hot shower (which was semi hot).

Ghorepani was freezing cold when we were there, and shortly after arriving, it began to rain which turned to hail. There was also some old snow on the ground in Ghorepani. Luckily, just after the hail stopped, the weather cleared and we got some amazing views of the Annapurna Himalaya range.

For dinner I ate a plate of vegetable fried rice (260 Rupees) and a cup of milk tea (60 Rupees). We went to sleep early as the next day we would climb up to Poon Hill summit.

Total hiking hours – about 7-8 hours

Stunning sunrise view at Poon Hill
Stunning sunrise view at Poon Hill

Day 3 – Ghorepani to Poon Hill, Ghorepani to Gandruk

At 5 am, we got out of our cozy sleeping bags piled high with blankets, dressed up (using our down jackets that we had rented in Pokhara), and made the 45 minute climb to the top of Poon Hill for sunrise.

The clear morning view of the Annapurna range was nothing short of majestic! This was the view that the entire Ghorepani Poon Hill trek is based upon, and it’s worth every step to get there.

We hiked back down and had breakfast at the lodge, I stuck with my muesli again. Drinking water was 60 Rupees per liter, so we refilled all of our bottles before beginning the main trek for the day.

On Day 3, the views were incredible. I literally couldn’t help myself from stopping every few steps to take another photo and video clip. We hiked along a parallel ridge, surely one of the most scenic hikes I’ve ever taken. The trail included lots of downhill and there were some sections of the trail that were covered in snow and ice – a little scary in some areas – but we took it slow and careful.

For lunch we stopped for another delicious plate of vegetarian dal bhat, a meal I really enjoyed. The achar chili sauce in particular was wonderful. Price for dal bhat was 360 Rupees.

We continued to hike, and got caught up in a little rain storm (which luckily didn’t last for too long) until arriving in the incredible town of Gandruk. Gandruk is actually quite a large village, and the views of the Annapurnas are outstanding. I wanted to stop hiking right there and remain in Gandruk for a month without doing anything but staring at the mountains – an amazing village.

We stayed at Muna Hotel for 350 Rupees per night.

I was so tired and so extremely sore on Day 3 that I just ate some snacks which I had brought with us and headed to sleep very early.

Total hiking hours – about 10-12 hours

View from Gandruk
View from Gandruk

Day 4 – Gandruk to Deurali

On Day 4 of the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek we had a leisurely morning, woke up about 7 am, but didn’t get started hiking until 8:30 or so. Since I had skipped dinner the night before I ordered up a huge plate of, you guessed it, dal baht (360 Rupees) for breakfast! A few heaps of rice and vegetables later, I was ready to start hiking.

I couldn’t find re-fillable drinking water in Gandruk, so had to buy a some 1 liter bottles for 100 Rupees each, ouch, but worth it.

The trail was mostly downhill, and mostly stone steps; it was great on the heart, but horrible on the knees. We hiked down and down and then back up again, passing through small villages and numerous small farms along the way.

We took a break for lunch, and since I had eaten a huge breakfast, I decided to just eat a few cups full of muesli for lunch, along with some other snacks.

At about 5 pm, we arrived to the very sleepy town of Deurali, really only a couple hours from a road (so if you were really pushing, you might be able to do the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek in 4 days).

We got a room at Hotel Trekkers Inn (350 Rupees), owned by an extremely nice Nepali lady who really took care of us. She boiled hot water for our showers and cooked us some delicious Tibet bread (140 Rupees) and an omelet with rice (320 Rupees).

I went to bed quite early again, sleeping like a baby!

Total hiking time – about 10 hours

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek
Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek

Day 5 – Deurali back to Pokhara (or to the Annapurna Eco Village)

We woke up quite early, I had a huge breakfast of muesli (of which I still had an entire bag still left), and began hiking. It only took about an hour to reach the permit check town of Pothana, a village that has road access and I think you could get a bus or taxi from quite near back to Pokhara.

We had arranged plans from Marigold Hotel (back in Pokhara) for our guide to lead us to the Annapurna Eco Village (1,000 Rupees per night). So we continued hiking, breaking for some dal bhat and fried chicken for lunch, and finally reaching the Eco Village in the early afternoon.

The Annapurna Eco Village was in a beautiful setting, but I didn’t like it that much. Due to its eco-ness, we had to get our own shower water in a bucket (and other things like that), and after 5 days of trekking I was just ready to do nothing and relax. So we ended up staying for just 1 night before catching a taxi back to civilization, Pokhara.

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Videos

Throughout the five day hike, we filmed videos detailing the main things we did and saw each day. Just watch these amazing views!!

Part 1 of the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek includes Day 1 – 2

Part 2 of the Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek includes Day 3 – 5

Trek Preparation

While in Pokhara, I stayed with, and booked everything through Marigold Hotel (Amrit Tours) – very highly recommended. The rooms at Marigold Hotel are around 700 Rupees, they are extremely clean, and the family that runs the hotel (as well as the tour agency on the ground floor) are all extremely friendly and helpful. Internet works pretty well when the electricity is on.

After asking around at various trekking tour agencies, Marigold (Amrit Tours) had some of the best prices and since they were so nice to us, we arranged everything through them, again I’d highly recommend their services.

Ghorepani Poon Hill trek required permits
Ghorepani Poon Hill trek required permits

Trek Permits

There are 2 different permits required for the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek. My wife and I paid a total of 6,650 Rupees for our permits.

1. Annapurna Conservation Permit – 1,000 Rupees per person
2. TIMS Trekker’s Permit – 1,825 Rupees per person

Marigold commission for arranging all permits – 500 Rupees per person

With little time to research or to worry about arranging all the permits myself, we had our guest house handle all our permits. You could save 500 Rupees per person by doing all the permits yourself, but I thought it was worth the commission.

Do you need a guide?
Do you need a guide?

Guide and Porter

It’s debatable wether you need a guide or not to do the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek. We decided to hire a guide, but if you wanted to save money, not bringing a guide is an option.

What I can say is the trail is very well maintained, however there aren’t always great signs, so not having a guide might require a lot of asking which direction to go to which village – could be confusing – but not impossible.

I personally thought it was fantastic that we brought a guide, mainly because we had a local along with us, and I didn’t have to keep looking at a map every 30 minutes. I could focus on taking photos and shooting videos without worrying about where to go.

Our guide also knew exactly which guest houses to take us to each night and also which restaurants to stop at. I thought having a guide was well worth the cost, and my wife felt more comfortable with a guide as well.

Again, we arranged our guide from Marigold Hotel (Amrit Tours) in Pokhara, at a cost of $20 US per day. We hired a guide for 5 days (so $100 for our guide for the entire trek).

There’s also an option to hire a porter if you wish someone else to carry your backpack. I think the cost would be similar per day as for a guide, maybe a bit less.

Renting gear and supplies in Pokhara
Renting gear and supplies in Pokhara

Renting Gear / Supplies

If you’re like us and don’t have trekking supplies, don’t worry, there are plenty of things to either purchase or rent for a trek while in Pokhara.

We came pretty empty handed, and since it was still winter when we did the trek, we had to rent some warm gear.

At a trekking store across the street from Marigold Hotel, we rented 2 sleeping bags (80 Rupees per day), 2 down jackets (100 Rupees per day), and 1 set of trekking poles (60 Rupees per day) all for 5 days for 2,100 Rupees. You’ll also need to put down a deposit.

Sleeping bag is debatable, but I’d recommend it. The lodges normally have blankets, but it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Other than the gear we rented, I mostly brought a pair of pants, a few shirts, and all the warm gear clothes I had. I hiked in just normal shoes, which are fine overall for the hike. Hiking boo

Typical accommodation
Typical accommodation

Accommodation on the Trek

I’ve done quite a few backpacking treks in the US where I had to bring all my own food, tent, and sleeping supplies. The Ghorepani Poon Hill trek on the other hand is what’s called a “Tea House Trek.”

Basically, the trek, while it does require a moderate level of fitness, is not an extreme wilderness survivor-man trek.

You basically hike from village to village, stay in decent but barebones lodges, and have the awesome option of eating delicious freshly cooked food.

As for accommodation (and you can see everywhere we stayed by looking at my day to day itinerary above), I didn’t even do any research but just let our guide lead us. We did the trek in mid-March and he did mention that it can be challenging to get rooms at peak season, but when we went, it was very quiet, sometimes we were even the only ones in the lodge.

Dal baht on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek
Dal baht on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek

Food on the Trek

I’ll be honest that I was initially shocked and then became slightly annoyed at the price of food on the trail. I had become accustomed in India and Nepal for paying a dollar or less for a full delicious meal.

But in the mountains, prices are far higher for food due to everything having to be transported by mule or hand up the mountain. Also, I think there’s some standard set prices for restaurants on trekking routes in Nepal.

After a few meals, I finally realized that I was being ridiculous for complaining (to myself) about the cost of food, and so I changed to having a positive attitude. The restaurant owners, while charging a lot for food, are hardly making much profit, and they have to work hard to bring all the food up the mountain. Hopefully the profits from tourism are put to good use.

So instead of complaining, I was thoroughly thankful for the opportunity to enjoy hot and deliciously cooked food all along the trek. Dal bhat, the Nepali food staple of rice, dal soup, vegetables, and achar chili sauce is such an energy packed meal when you’re trekking. Dal baht normally costs about 300 – 400 Rupees on the trek. Some Nepali street food (video) would have been tasty too, but restaurants mostly sell packaged chips, cookies, and candy.

The menus were pretty much all the same at every restaurant, offering local Nepali dal bhat, spaghetti, bread, omelet, Tibetan bread, porridge, fried noodles, and fried rice. All meals were about 300 – 400 Rupees. Tea and coffee (terrible coffee, don’t order it if you like good coffee, stick with tea) cost about 50 – 60 Rupees per cup.

In order to save money, in Pokhara before we left on the trek, I stocked up on snacks like peanuts and chocolate and also brought some instant noodles, 3 bags of muesli for breakfasts, and some cans of fish.

You could save quite a bit of money by not purchasing food, but in the end I just decided to enjoy the hot cooked meals, and I loved it!

Drinking water
Drinking water

Drinking Water

As you probably guessed, water is not potable anywhere on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek. So there are a few options for drinking water.

1. There’s opportunities everywhere to purchase new bottles of water, so you’ll never go thirsty. Usually the price is 80 – 100 Rupees for a 1 liter bottle, depending on how high in the mountains you are.

2. If you have empty bottles, many lodges and restaurants offer drinking water re-fills for about 60 Rupees per liter.

3. Water purification tablets, known as Aquatabs, are available all over Nepal. You just add a tablet to a liter of water, let it sit for a while and it’s then safe to drink.

For the most part we tried to re-fill our bottles (option #2), but in some places we had to buy new bottles of water as well. On the last day, I decided to test out the Aquatabs, and I didn’t get sick, and saved some money in the process. Overall, we probably had to spend around 300 – 400 Rupees on drinking water everyday.

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Costs
Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Costs

Ghorepani Poon Hill Trek Costs

By this point, if you’re made it this far, you’re probably interested in knowing how much we spent in total on the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek. Here’s what we spent all together for 2 of us for 5 days:

Day 1 – 1,550 Rupees ($15)
Day 2 – 2,530 Rupees ($25)
Day 3 – 2,225 Rupees ($22)
Day 4 – 2,260 Rupees ($23)
Day 5 – 1,330 Rupees ($13 – not including the accommodation this night)

Taxi to starting point – 1,500 Rupees ($15)
Taxi back to Pokhara – 600 Rupees ($6)

Guide – $100 total ($20 per day or about 2,000 Rupees – 10,000 Rupees for 5 days)
Permits – 6,650 Rupees ($67)
Rentals – 2 sleeping bags (80 Rupees per day for 5 days x 2), 2 down jackets (100 Rupees per day for 5 days x 2), 1 set of trekking poles (60 Rupees per day for 5 days) – all for 2,100 Rupees ($21)

TOTAL Cost of 5 day Ghorepani Poon Hill trek for 2 people – 30, 745 Rupees ($312)

We had an absolutely amazing time, and the views of the Himalayas were beyond spectacular. The Ghorepani Poon Hill trek is a great way to hike and be in the mountains while still being able to sleep securely and warmly and eat freshly cooked meals.

The trek was the highlight of my trip to Nepal and I’ll never forget the breathtaking scenery!

Have you completed the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek?

Share your experience and any other tips in the comments section below! I’d love to hear from you.



131 comments. I'd love to hear from you!

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  • Christy Love

    4 weeks ago

    Hi Mark! This is very informative and has help me to save time in googling and either booking at other expensive tour packages. Just perfect since me and my friend is on a very tight budget. 🙂 So, we are actually planning to do this trek mid January 2018. Just wanted to check if you have an idea if this trail is open at this month and how the weather will be treating us? Thank you 😀

  • Taranath Bohara

    5 months ago

    Wonderful experience of Ghorepani Poon Hill trek route in the Annapurna, which I made few days ago with my friend. The beautiful views of mountain, terraced fields, river valley, rhododendron forest, domestic animals, friendly Gurung, Magar , and Thakali people. It is an experience of life to spend the fresh air with a little bit exercise is my memory rest of the life.

    • Thom

      5 months ago

      May i know how much was the cost cos we are going to do it in November this year.
      Thanks.
      Thom

  • Dean White

    7 months ago

    Just back from completing the Naya Pul, Ghorepani Naya Pul circuit over 4 days. I’m in the “not so fit over 50s” bracket and whilst the first couple of days (going up 2000m) is tough, I soon find a pace that was comfortable. We managed the circuit in 4 days – hooray. On the advice our guide we didn’t compete with the other 200 people making the climb to Poon Hill but rather headed for the Dureli Pass viewpoint – marginally higher than Poon Hill but importantly it was on route to our next stop so we didn’t have the overhead of the two/ three hour Poon Hill jaunt. We booked a guided package with Adams Tours who are based in Pokhara. This included car to and from Naya Pul (from Pokhara), a guide, good accommodation plus all the food (breakfast, lunch and dinner) but not drinks. Our guide was brilliant, very knowledgeable and very attentive to our needs. While this is a more expensive option, for novices like me and the wife it worked. I can’t rate either our guide Shiva Aacharya or Adams Tours highly enough.

  • Wirahadi Jatiputra

    8 months ago

    Mark, thanks, great post and very helpful. I plan to do Poon Hill trekking in a months to come and this detail information is certainly help a lot.

  • jasmine bindley

    9 months ago

    This is absolutely fantastic – thank you!

  • Kristina Landry

    9 months ago

    Thank you Mark! This was a wonderful post/blog:)

  • Carol

    10 months ago

    Hi,
    I’m considering this trek with my partner. I’m a confident walker, but hiking the rolling landscape of the UK seems a far cry from trekking in Nepal. How strenuous is the Ghorepani-Poon Hill Trek? What level of fitness should I have before going?
    Also, whilst I’m a confident hiker, I don’t like narrow ridge walks or arête walking. Is there anything like that on the route?
    Thanks

  • Shiva Adhikari

    12 months ago

    This trek is a wonderful and short trek. 😉
    I enjoyed a lot during Poon Hill Trek. Happy Trek!!

    • Abhyuday Paliwal

      9 months ago

      Hi Shiva ! Could you please tell if we could start our trek without making permit and if food and water are really that costly – RS 100 per liter of bottle ?
      Thanks

  • Heather

    1 year ago

    Thanks so much for all the info! We are going in 2 weeks and bringing our 6 year old son. Hope it goes well. We have some Nepali friends who seem to think this is no big deal, I’m sure they do it in flip-flops, but to my American body it seems a bit intimidating.

  • Anna

    1 year ago

    Great, detailed outline of the trek! I am looking to do some trekking in Nepal and had some advice for this trek as I have recently had an operation and will not be completely able bodied, however am building up my fitness now ready for April 2017. I have been looking at booking through a tours website but seem very expensive compared with how you have done it, however I am travelling alone so would you advice to book with a group?

  • Patsy Brennan

    1 year ago

    I just finished my trekking Poon Hill. It was a fantastic trek ever and ever in my beautiful mind. I will surely visit Nepal again!. All things are done by Emerging Nepal.

  • Intrepid Tess

    1 year ago

    Great blog! Very helpful, thnx! I’m planning this trek in February – do you know if it’s still an OK time to go as it’s winter. Thanks in advance for ur reply 🙂

  • Dr.Kolitha Lelwala

    1 year ago

    I have been to Nepal in 2006 and completed this trek which is marvelous to climb.

  • Dennis

    1 year ago

    Mark, thank you for the detailed blog! This is awesome! I’ve been looking for a trek just like this. Although my research has just started, this seems perfect. Looking forward to seeing Nepal next Spring.

  • Teegan

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark
    I just read your blog and the trek sounds amazing! My girlfriend and I will be traveling to Nepal in January of 2017. We would love to do a shorter hike (4-7days) and have heard wonderful things about the Poon Hill Trek. I just wanted to know, are there quite a lot of places to stay on the trek at any point? You see, my girlfriend has Multiple Sclerosis and although she can walk a fair bit each day, 4-5 hours may be the maximum just depending. We just want to make sure that there will be somewhere we can stay when she has had enough without having to push herself to walk another 2 hours to find accommodation. Your help would be much appreciated!

    • Steve

      1 year ago

      Hi Teegan, I completed the poon hill trek last week and yes there are plenty of places to stay. My father had MS, make sure you bring the hiking sticks as some of the steps, especially on the way down, are not in the best condition.

  • Kyle Parrish

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    This guide looks really awesome. We are looking to do this trek in January (which I know may be cold). How did you find your guide for $100 a day? Also did you book the lodges before hand or just when you showed up?

    Thanks so much and I will join your newsletter as well!

    Kyle

    • Shona

      2 years ago

      Hi Kyle,
      I too am looking to do this treck in January. I am having a hard time finding information on how cold it actually is. I would have my 10 y old son with me so dont want it to be too chalkenging weather wise but that is the only time of the year we can go.. Where have you found info?
      Also thanks mark for the photos and information.

  • ricko

    2 years ago

    i want to ask, from annapurna eco village, there are taxi or you must walk to Deurali first to get jeep…..

  • Andy

    2 years ago

    Nepal is one of our dream destination! But I’m a newbie, don’t know anything about trekking. As I googling, Poon Hill is one of the “easy & short trek route”. Do you consider Poon Hill as an easy trek?
    Thanks!

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Andy, overall, Poon Hill is not a technical trek, so it’s rated pretty easy. However, you still need to be in decent shape, walking for about 6 – 8 hours per day, and lots of steps.

  • Carlos

    2 years ago

    Sorry to ask this however, I will be travelling alone and will be on a budget but, I am planning to hire a guide for the trek as you mentioned its about a $100USD for 5 days. Do I also need to budget his food and accomodation as well?

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Carlos, I think the hotels normally put up the guides for free and also I think when you pay for your food it already includes the guides. If I remember correctly that’s how it worked. Hope you have a great trip.

  • jo nas

    2 years ago

    Hey mark, I have loved your work since I first saw your vid. Awesome. I am from nepal and maybe you should know that apart from the advertised places by the tourism board, there are nicer places. Sometimes much more nicer. Think you missed the kanchanjunga base camp trek buddy. Its a great place. By the way, when you taste a food, I always love your first expression. Its seems peaceful. Great job. Keep doing what you are doing!

  • din

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark, any idea how much is the map for Ghorepani tracking?

  • Lisa

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark, I have a bit of a fear of heights. Are there any areas on this trek where the trail is on a narrow ledge?

  • Karsten

    2 years ago

    Hi Mark!

    I’m gonna start the trek on Monday – two days from now. So exited! 🙂 I’m going without a guide or sleeping bag – and I will learn my lessons … But it will be awesome! And I bet I’ll come back for more trekking after this one.

    Thanks for all this information – big help!
    K

    • Mark Wiens

      2 years ago

      Hey Karsten, good to hear from you. Have an awesome time!

  • leigh gretton

    2 years ago

    must have been one of the best weeks of my life up there

  • Shaun

    3 years ago

    What a great read. We did a variation of this trek – over 7 days – in December 1991. We hired a guide – Chandra – and a porter – Shankar – directly, in Kathmandu. Got to hear of this great porter / guide team from another trekker in the Kathmandu Guest House. First night, we stayed in the only teahouse in Suiket; then Hotel Sunrise in Birethanti; The Tourist Lodge, Ulleri; Sunrise Lodge, Deurali; Hotel Milan, Ghandruk, and our last night was in Dhampus before an overnight bus trip from Pokhara back to Kathmandu – complete with a tyre puncture resulting in seeing in Christmas Day stuck on the side of a pothole-filled road waiting for another bus to pass by which had a spare (ours didn’t). Prices – just over UK£1 for a margherita pizza, a pot of fantastic coffee and a bottle of mineral water at the lakeside Don’t Cross Me By restaurant in Pokhara (I see it’s now called Don’t Pass Me By). Arrived back in Kathmandu at 6am December 25th. Fond memories.

  • Kimberly

    3 years ago

    Has anyone done the hike in Late August? We will be hiking starting August 30th. I was wondering if anyone who specifically did this time of year could tell me how hot/cold it got….how much rain during the days they had and how bad the leeches were (if any encountered).

  • Goutham.T

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    I’m going for Ghorepani Poon hill trek next month (April 20th-30th). I wanted to tell you that your blog and the videos have helped me really well.

    I’m planning to do this alone, a solo trek (I have always wanted to travel in Nepal alone). My plan is to pitch a tent every night and may be 2 or 3 nights stay with the villegers or budget hotels.

    Can you please help me out if you know any places that I can go to and pitch a tent.
    I’ll be doing this trek from Nayapul, Ulleri side.

    I thank you in advance.

    Goutham:)

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hello Goutham, great to hear from you, and I’m glad this has been helpful. Since I didn’t camp, I’m not entirely sure of the restrictions or what’s available. I think I did notice some camp spot at some of the lodges, so they might rent a small outdoor space for tents.

      Hope you have an incredible time when you go!

  • Nish

    3 years ago

    Great blog Mark! I will be arriving in Nepal in early April and your blog was very informative and helped me budget for my planned trek to Poon hill. Thanks!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Nish, great to hear from you, glad this has been helpful. Hope you have a wonderful trek and trip to Nepal.

  • Alexander Douglas

    3 years ago

    I’m a big fan of your food videos (lots of great advise while me and my girlfriend travelled india), I was just randomly looking for advise for this trek as me and my girlfriend are planning to do this in a few weeks, we’re already in Nepal, and I am so surprised and happy to see you’ve made a guide.
    Thanks Mark!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Alexander, great to hear from you, thank you very much. Hope you are enjoying your time in Nepal.

  • Andy Scott

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark.
    Thanks for the Poon Hill trek video. Did same trek about eight years ago. Didn’t realise you were a food freak, but it was great for the camera to be on the meals. Many videos hardly mention the food. I eat small amounts regularly so I had to laugh when you said you needed extra rice. I didn’t have video on my trek so this brought back good memories. Since then I have done four more treks, Annapurna Base Camp, Gokyo Ri, Everest Base Camp and the Langtang valley…just love Nepal. Cheers, Andy UK.

  • Dong Li

    3 years ago

    I have booked my trip with Breakfree Adventures based in Kathmandu and the package price including Kathmandu Hotels, all transfers, pokhara hotels, all arrangements for the trekking including guide, porter etc on US$ 410 per person as we are two, is that reasonable price?

    Thank you

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hello Dong, great to hear from you, glad you’ll be going to Nepal soon. You can see all my price breakdown, but since your tour includes transfers and Kathmandu hotels, I think that’s not a bad price. Hope you have a great trip.

  • DC Dana

    3 years ago

    I just did this trek over Thanksgiving — Love your photos and info! I’m still capturing my adventures but my first post about the trek is below. Thanks for sharing!

    Stone stairs and animal poo: My Himalayan journey-
    http://dcdana.blogspot.com/2014/12/nepal-3-stone-stairs-and-animal-poo-my.html

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Dana, great to hear you did the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek, and glad you enjoyed it too. Thanks for sharing, your article is great!

  • Subigya

    3 years ago

    We were on the same route about 2-3 years ago. I had hiked with my friends at work from Pokhara to Nayapul via Ghorepani and Poonhill. I still remember it; it was truly awesome.

  • Phan Vi

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    Im heading to Pokhara in mid Feb 2015. Reading your blog gave me a lot a lot of ideas and make my plan clearer. Thank you for such a great effort to produce video and very very detailed travel plan, budget for us. Big thanks.

    btw, just watched your Bun thit nuong video in Saigon. That’s awesome.

    Im from Vietnam! 🙂 Xin chào

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Phan, great to hear that you’ll be going to Nepal, hope you have a wonderful trip. Thank you for watching, I had an amazing time in Vietnam.

  • Wasi

    3 years ago

    Hi dear Mark Wiens,
    first of All i want to say really thanks you for this detail post.
    Its Wasi from Pakistan, how are you i hope you are fine with the blessing of Almighty God.
    I’m planning a trip to Nepal next year in the end of Feb-2015, with my newly weds wife (going to marry in January-2015) .After 7 years of struggling love life, (faced traditional family issues etc), finally We both find each other and going to marry in January-2015, So i want to give her surprising trip although my budget is very short but i wish to do this..and she even don’t know what i am going to plan, i want to surprise her when we will be on airport for departure.
    We will be travelling from Lahore to Kathmandu and planning for a 5 to 6 nights stay. In my trip poon trekking was not included, but now after reading your post i will definitely do it. can u suggest me good itinerary, because i really don’t know about Nepal & its locations. My Wife like nature, and some kind of adventurous things, , she has deep interest in historical places & and always explore something new. So suggest me all these things!

    and in the end i want to tell u that i have 70,000/- NPR after booking return air tickets.So We have to do all within this budget. We will prefer three star hotels. And i have heard about positive things about NepalGunj & Pokhara. i also want to take ride on lutera light flight from avia club of pokhara.
    Waiting your response Dear Mark!

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Wasi, great to hear from you, and congratulations about your upcoming marriage!

      Glad that you’ll be taking your wife to Nepal, I think that’s an amazing idea and she will love it. As for Nepal, I was only able to visit Kathmandu and Pokhara and then to this Poon Hill trek. If you think you can make it, I would really recommend this trek and the same itinerary my wife and I did was very good. Together for everything my wife and I spent about 30,000 Rupees (price breakdown at the end of this article), so I think with your budget of 70,000 you should be able to do this no problem.

      Again, huge congratulations, and hope you have an amazing time in Nepal!

  • Rita

    3 years ago

    I am looking to do this trek with in a group of for in mid October. We are worried about tea house availability, but can’t find out how to book them ahead of time from out of the country. Any suggestions?

    We found an organization that would organize everything – transport, food, accommodation, guide, porters – for 330 a person, which is the most reasonable we’ve found, though it seems like we could do it ourselves for half the price if we weren’t worried about “sold out” tea houses when we arrive.

  • Rahul

    3 years ago

    Hey, this is pretty informative post. Thank you so much. One thing I wanted to ask you. Instead of taking a lodge or a guest house, is it possible to do camping and cook your own food? Do you need special permits or you can just camp and cook anywhere you want?
    Thanks 🙂

  • Sun

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    Thanks for the sharing of poon hill trekking. It is very informative and the information is valuable to me.

    I have asked one of the agent in kathmandu about the permit and transportation arrangement. His charges for the private car to nayapul is $30 and 2 permit application are $55 per person. I have read up your expenses summary and found out that your trekking permit was only $67 for 2 persons. Don’t you think is way too expensive which charge me at $55 per person?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Sun, thank you very much, glad it’s helpful. I think the rates, if you ask from Kathmandu, will be more than if you make your own arrangements once you’re in Pokhara. Yah, that sounds a bit high. All the best with your trek!

  • Débora

    3 years ago

    Hi mark, congratulations for you website. It is completely perfect and informative, keep going. And thanks for sharing your experience.
    I’m going alone to Nepal in December and I was wondering if have only a porter with me instead of a guideway a problem. I really don’t think I will need all the informations from a guide, but just to know the way for each village and someone to carry my stuf. Did you see someone in this kind of trekking?
    Thanks again.

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hey Debora, thank you very much for your kind words, and great to hear that you’ll be going to Nepal soon. Hmm, I’m not sure about that, but I’m sure you could find a porter who is also a guide at the same time. Maybe just ask at one of the agencies, and they should be able to find one for you. Hope you have a great trip!

  • Samuel G

    3 years ago

    Mark thanks for writing such a helpful guide!! I have been living in India for about 4 months now (work) and am planning on meeting a few brave family members in Nepal for the Poonhill Trek in September. I had so many questions leading into this research but I feel like you’ve answered most of them in this great blog.

    I think I may contact the Amrit Tours group you mentioned for our trek as well but I just wanted to know if you think we need to actually book some of the guest houses in advance (since September is more of the busy season than November)? I’m sure Amrit tours will be able to answer but I figured I’d reach out to you first.

    Thanks again and I hope to have the same beautiful weather for our trip!
    Sam

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Sam, thank you very much, glad this post has been helpful. Hmm, I’m not totally sure about that, during this season. I think it would be wise maybe to ask a few tour companies, and they should know the current situation about booking lodges and how busy the routes are right now. Hope you have a wonderful trek with your family.

  • Samantha

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark!

    I saw your videos and read your post about your Ghorephani Poonhill Trek. It’s really helpful!

    Two of my friends and I are planning to do the same trek, and we actually contacted Amrit Tours, since you highly recommended them. I just had a few questions though.

    You said you arranged everything through Amrit Tours, so does that mean you purchased a package through Amrit Tours that included lodging and meals? You were specific with the price of meals, and I noticed that sometimes, you chose to eat or not eat breakfast on your trek, so I wasn’t sure if you were paying for your meals separate from Amrit Tours.

    Also, did Amrit Tours help you with booking your flight and hotel? My friends and I are looking into the expenses for our trip, but it looks like we may be spending more that what you had spent on your trip to Nepal.

    If you could provide us with any details that would be really helpful. Thanks Mark!! 😀

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Samantha, great to hear from you, glad you’re going to Nepal.

      For Amrit Tours, all we did was arrange the trekking permits, and a guide, and that’s it. We paid for our own accommodation and food along the way (but our guide took us to lodges and restaurants, but we paid). So we had no package tour or anything like that, just the permits and the guide.

      For flights and hotels, I think it will be much cheaper if you arrange everything yourself. Are you flying into Kathmandu? We took the bus, which was nice ride, from Kathmandu to Pokhara.

      Hope this helps.

      • Nish

        3 years ago

        In regards to catching a bus from Kathmandu to Pokahara, did you get a local bus or a tourist bus Mark?

        • Mark Wiens

          3 years ago

          Hi Nish, I think it was a tourist bus, but many locals rode it too, – it was lined up, and left in the morning from near Thamel district.

  • joe

    3 years ago

    great stuff, i will be going later this year and this helped me no end with info.
    respect.

  • Sapna

    3 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    I’m planning to do this trek in the 2nd week of July.
    My question was regarding the elevation levels between Gandruk (2750) and Deurali (3100m) . It appears from your blog, and data recorded on Day 4 , that you experienced a downhill trek – While the elevation levels of these two places , indicate it might in fact be an uphill trek.

    Could you please clarify ?

    Also What I’m trying to clarify if – “Gorepani – > Deurali ->Gandruk ->Pokhara” seems to make more sense than “Gorepani – >Gandruk -> Deurali ->Pokhara”

    Could you please let me know ?

    Thanks !
    Sapna

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Sapna, great to hear from you. I guess it is higher in elevation, but if I remember correctly, it was mostly downhill or flat for the majority of the day, but then there may have been a climb at the end near Deurali. Overall, it was a long day, but I didn’t feel the elevation change so much like the other first days.

      I think Gandruk is in-between Deurali, which is why we stopped there for night. But you could go Gorepani – Gandruk – then all the way to Pokhara in the same day.

      All the best, you’re going to have a great trip.

  • Shukri

    3 years ago

    Hey Mark!

    Thanks for the article and videos! My friends and I will be going for the trek next week, and were wondering what the temperatures would be, and if there is electricity at the tea houses. You mind clarifying?

    • Mark Wiens

      3 years ago

      Hi Shukri, good to hear from you, glad that you’ll be doing the trek soon. As for weather, I did it in mid-March, and it was still a little cold, but so now I think weather should be pretty warm. You’ll want to double check when you are in Pokhara. For electricity, there’s mostly battery powered lights, and if you need to charge your battery, you can usually as the front desk where they often have a few plugins to charge things. All the best, have fun.

      • shukri

        3 years ago

        Thanks!
        Also, is there any cell reception at areas on the trek?

  • sharif Haque

    4 years ago

    Hay Mark,

    After reading your article I have decided and did the trekking in 4 days. But we used Himalayan Joy Adventure pvt ltd. They are good too. We took one porter cum guide. (We just took minimum items). Price wise everything is the same as you described. I tried to book tea houses but it did not worked. Usually people goes there and book the tea houses. We enjoyed a lot. Than you very much for sharing your experience.

    Sharif Haque

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Sharif, thank you for sharing about your trip, glad you enjoyed it too!

  • Rampurple

    4 years ago

    Hello! Thanks for this informative post. I’m headed there in a few days so it’s good to know what to expect!
    Is there any cell phone service or internet along the way for us to be able to contact home? Also, did the tea house lodges all have electricity (for charging our cameras)?

    • sharif Haque

      4 years ago

      Yes they have electricity. 220 V and 2 prong round outlet.Some times they have load shading. Cell phones work well.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Rampurple, good to hear you’ll be going soon. Thanks Sharif for the info. As for electricity, in my case not all places had lights, but some didn’t have power outlets in individual rooms, but they would normally have some outlets at the front desk / reception – so if you just ask them to charge your battery they usually will. Hope you have a great time!

  • Fabian

    4 years ago

    Wonderful video and write up. I’m currently researching the trip for my girlfriend and I in mid-May. Thanks for sharing your trip 🙂

  • Eva

    4 years ago

    Thank you for this great Report which is very helpful. I start in a few days 🙂
    Cheers,
    Eva

  • Azian

    4 years ago

    Hello Mark. It was great to read your post as my husband and I are planning to do this trek sometime soon. Your post is very useful and it will definitely help us to plan ours.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Azian, great to hear that, glad this helps. Hope you have a fantastic time when you go!

  • Murvin Auboodhoomonde

    4 years ago

    Wow! A great post: very useful, clear! Brilliant!
    We will go to Pokhara in two days and just wanted to know if the longest day (10-12 hours trekking) could be broken down into two, if there are options to sleep like half of that time?
    Also did you have electricity in all the guesthouses you mentioned (like for recharging camera batteries?)
    Thanks in advance for your advices,
    BR
    Murvin

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Murvin, no problem, glad this is helpful. Yes, I think there are options to cut the long day in half, there are plenty of facilities along the route. As for electricity, not always, I can’t remember which ones didn’t have power, but the guest houses often have some source of power and I asked the reception and they could always charge my battery for me when they would turn on the generator – so just ask them! Have a great trip!

      • Murvin Auboodhoomonde

        4 years ago

        Hey Mark,
        Thanks again. Just one last question, you said you got back to Deurali after Ghandruk and then you reached Pothana. But Deurali is on the way back to Ghorepani and Pothana is in the direction of Phedi. Could you just clarify this point?
        Thanks and have a nice day, we leave tomorrow!
        Murvin

  • Stef Sharratt

    4 years ago

    Hi Mark,

    Was great reading your guide as me and a friend did this trek in January 2013, just a couple of months before you and really did bring all the memories flooding back! Much like you, we had a guide with us but was sorted from Kathmandu. We had a few days in Chitwan with elephant rides and guided walks through the jungle and 2 nights in Pokhara plus 3 nights accommodation whilst trekking. All in all, we spent about $400 each which I thought was amazing value for the things we got to do.

    Also, on the subject of having a guide, I’m delighted that we decided to hire one as he was great company along the trek, very knowledgable and took away any sort of stress that could arise in being in an unfamiliar place. Plus, when we arrived back in Kathmandu, he welcomed us into his home to meet his wife and 10 month old baby and cooked us some traditional dal baht. Yes, you could save money by not having one but I’ve gained a friend for life by going with him and hope to return sooner rather than later to see him again.

    Once again, thanks for the great read.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Shef, thank you so much for sharing your experiences too, glad you had such a great trip as well. I fully agree with you about having a guide, while it’s not 100% necessary, it’s a great way to connect with a local Nepali, and learn from him.

  • Nayeem

    4 years ago

    Can I complete the poon hill trek in 3 days instead of 5 days. I will stay only for a week in nepal. If possible, can you please describe the itinerary.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hello Nayeem, that might be a push, but maybe if you’re really in shape you could do it.

  • Nathan

    4 years ago

    This is extremely useful. Myself and my girlfriend are going in April and cant wait to do this trek.

    Thanks for spending the time to write it. so helpful!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Nathan, glad you found it useful, and hope you have a wonderful trek!

  • Joop

    4 years ago

    Mark,

    In what time of year did you make this trekking. I think it was in March/April?

  • Dann

    4 years ago

    I love your info on poon hill. it really help me solve a lot of mysteries.

    However, i would like to beg to differ for Marigold Hotel (Amrit Tours). when i was there the staffs are nonchalant and rude. i think its was because i didnt sign up any tour or package with them. their rooms are clean but hot water is limited. you had to run it for 15mins before warm water appear. and basically wasting water as well. but i guess this is normal in Nepal.

    i enquire with them for chitwan safari tour as well. they quote me an expensive price for $90 for the hotel that i can get for $70 and yet they did not cover TRANSPORT. which is absurd. because 95% of the tour agency i ask cover transport from Pohkara to Chitwan to Kathmunda.

    what turn me off is after my trek i went back and plan to stay there as they still kept my luggage. they simply raise the price of the room. all i wanted was the same rate that i paid when i stay there previously. and i had a conversation with the boss prior leaving for the trek to have the room for that price. then to my surprise it was not honoured.

    Therefore if you want to get porter or guide, i’ll advise you to stay with them. if not i think you are better off somewhere else.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Dann,

      Thank you so much for reading my article, and I appreciate you sharing about your experience. So sorry to hear Marigold wasn’t a good experience for you. When I was there the staff were all really friendly and nice, but things can change. Yah, hot water problems are pretty common just about everywhere in Nepal.

      How was your trek in the end? Did you do the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek?

  • Kana

    4 years ago

    How much did the Aquatabs tablets cost?

  • raazaa

    4 years ago

    Hi Mark, Great blog and nice description of your Nepal travels. I am planning to head there alone for 5 days in early March 2014 too. Considering you went at a similar time last year, can you please explain what clothing you took and especially what footware you were using?

    Thanks in advance! 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Raazaa, great to hear you’ll be planning a trip to Nepal. I used a pair of Salomon hiking shoes, and my wife was in a normal pair of tennis shoes. For clothing we just wore jeans and had sweatshirts. We rented down jackets, but I only needed on the hike to the very top Poon Hill that morning at 5 am. So overall, I think just tennis shoes, jeans, and a few jackets is fine.

      • raazaa

        4 years ago

        Thanks. Thats helpful! 🙂

  • Audrey

    4 years ago

    Thank you for sharing these details! I will return to Nepal next month for this trek, your write-up is one of the best to be used as a reference. Namaste.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Thank you very much for checking it out Audrey. Hope you have a great time in Nepal!

  • Lilly Woo

    4 years ago

    Hi Mark, I am a big fan of your food videos and after seeing your Nepal trek, me and a friend also did the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek during November 2013. It was an experience of a life time and I have you to thank for inspiring me. The trek is not easy which you know. The hot food in the mountain is great. I agree with you – hire at least a guide. We also had a porter because I am petite and it would be too difficult for me with the weight to carry. Nepalese are warm and genuine. The teahouse owners are great cooks. The rooms can be better but it was good enough. I can’t stop talking about the hike now that I am back in Vancouver, Canada. Also, because of you, I went back to my place of birth, Yangon, Myanmar and did a foodie tour as well. Love your videos.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Lilly, awesome to hear from you, and so glad that you did the Ghorepani Poon Hill trek and also went back to Yangon! I still dream about the scenery on the trek sometimes, it was truly majestic!

  • Ramesh

    4 years ago

    Thanks Mark !! For your lovely videos and informative articles about Ghorepatan Tracking route. It was really worth reading all you have posted and I would really be happy if you post some video of Chatpate and Pani Puri from Kathmandu. I wish you visit Nepal again. 🙂

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hello Ramesh, thank you very much for reading, glad it’s useful. I would love to come back again for another visit!

  • Anne

    4 years ago

    Thanks for the great and informative post about this trek! My boyfriend and I are headed on an adventure early 2014 and Nepal is on our list! I appreciate the details you’ve provided and the pictures are stunning!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Anne, no problem. Hope you have a wonderful time in Nepal, you’re going to enjoy it!

  • Talya

    4 years ago

    Great article, very informative and wish we’d seen it before we left. We just got back last week from our trip which included two weeks in Nepal and also did the Poon Hill Trek but we did up and back the same way as we had limited time, which was a lot of stairs but as you said definitely well worth it!!!! Our costs were similar for two of us though we also had a porter which cost another $18/day, though if we were ever to do this trek again I don’t think we’d bother with either a porter or guide as the track is well travelled and straight forward to find your way.
    We thoroughly enjoyed every part of our journey there, from trekking, white water rafting, canyoning, safari to just checking out some of the towns and temples and recommend it to anyone wanting an adventure.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Talya, great to hear you had a wonderful trip to Nepal. I’m dreaming about going back!!

  • Rawat

    4 years ago

    I love Nepal for its unspoiled beauty and various adventure activities, there could be no better place on earth than Nepal.

    Excellent and very informative article, you have mentioned all thing about Nepal traveling & trekking . I think your article is very helpful for those who want traveling in Nepal

  • Tara

    4 years ago

    I’ll be there in 2 weeks, and this was VERY helpful. Thank you!

  • renegadepilgrim

    4 years ago

    Hey Mark, what was your average mileage each day? What may take you 7-8 hours might take me 5 hours…it would be helpful to know how many kilometers a day you walked in your guide. I had not heard of this route and am planning to go to Nepal next fall to go trekking. I am an experienced backpacker and plan to bring my Sawyer Squeeze as well. Is water commonly found along the way? Also, I have heard you can buy decent knock-offs in Katmandu, what was your experience with this, if any? We will be coming with our gear ready for trekking, but if I can save some weight and space in my bag and get things cheaper there, I might do that too.

    We might add this to our list. Thanks for the complete information!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey, good to hear from you! To be honest I’m really not sure how many kilometers we actually walked each day as I had no map or distance measure. As far as time goes, we kept a moderate leisure pace, not too fast, so if you’re really in shape you could probably do it quite a bit faster. It’s a good idea to bring your own water filter – otherwise you have either buy bottles of water along the route (which is available), or use tablets to purify water – so if you have your own filter, that would be the best. Yes, I saw plenty of gear for sale in Kathmandu, not sure of the prices of quality though. You can also rent for pretty cheap, that’s what we did in Pokhara. Hope you have a great trip!

  • Douglas

    4 years ago

    Interesting guide. I’ve lived in Nepal on and off over the years and have done most of the mainstream treks. I’ve never taken a guide, and haven’t regretted that choice. If you’re traveling alone and/or are interested in contributing to the local economy by hiring someone, I’d definitely do it, but for the most part guides are from Pokhara and the trails are absolutely manageable on your own. Guides also have hook ups with local lodges, shops, etc. and get cuts on the side for supposedly highlighting “deals”. If you are on a quick trip and don’t have time or simply don’t feel like navigating, ask around Pokhara to make sure you book with a credible agency. I did Poon Hill in November 2012 for $100. Often tourists overpay and inflate the prices for everyone else. I met a few Australians who paid around $400-500 AUD which is absolutely insane. The shady line between paying a fair price/keeping it all relative/and maintaining your travel budget, I guess! 🙂

  • Sudeepto

    4 years ago

    Hi Mark

    I have been watching your food and travel videos over the last couple of months and I think they are really true to the purpose. Next time you are in Kolkata, please let me know!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Sudeepto, thank you so much for watching and following, I appreciate it. Thank you for the invitation, if I’m in Kolkata again will let you know!

  • John | MyFunkyTravel

    4 years ago

    Useful post! Looks like an epic trip and you did well to do it so cheaply

  • Shepon | skytrek

    4 years ago

    Thanks for writing such an article.I got the clear guides for my tour to this place. But can you say what is the procedure of paperwork to visit this place from Bangladesh.

  • Mike | Earthdrifter

    4 years ago

    Excellent detailed guide! Considering you’re hiking some of the most scenic trails in the world, the price is right. What an experience!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Hey Mike, thanks a lot, yes I was quite happy with the budget we spent, including a guide!

  • Nash

    4 years ago

    This is the ultimate guide IMHO, the guide no one wants you to see.

    • Anwesha

      4 years ago

      I have been to Pokhara twice but somehow never could plan the Ghorepani trek. Bookmarking this guide.
      The tip about Aquatabs is great considering how expensive bottled water is on the mountains. In the plains you would get bottled water at about 20 rupees or less.

      • Tim Moon

        4 years ago

        I plan on taking my Sawyer Squeeze filter. It’s only 3 ounces and easy to use. Even at 100 rupees, that’s still not much compared to the US.

      • Mark Wiens

        4 years ago

        Hey Anwesha, hope you can do some trekking on your next trip to Pokhara. Thanks for the tip Tim!

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Thank you Nash!

  • Tim Moon

    4 years ago

    That’s much less expensive for the two of you than I was expecting to see for one person. Especially when you mentioned that you hired a guide. I think Nepal just climbed my list to #1 for post-Korea travel next year. Thanks for writing such a detailed post.

    • Mark Wiens

      4 years ago

      Awesome to hear that Tim, it is more affordable than I had previously thought as well!